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Deuteronomy 6: It's All About The Beginnings
Deuteronomy 6: It's All About The Beginnings

Calvary Baptist Temple • March 23, 2020

By Allan Bosson


Our reading for this week will take us from Deuteronomy chapter 6 to chapter 23. 

Deuteronomy 6 is without question one of the most important and informative chapters in all of God’s Word. In fact, to Jews, it is one of the most cherished passages in all of their Bible, or Ten arch. Actually, it is one of the very first passages a young Jewish child is required to know and understand well. They commit the principles of this chapter to memory, certainly before they ever begin to face the real world outside of their homes. The interesting truth, however, is that to a Christian the principles outlined here are just as important as they are to a Jew. 


There is so much one could say about Deuteronomy chapter 6, but let me just outline three points of importance to Christians. First, in chapter 6:1-9, the writer of Deuteronomy urges us to begin life well—make sure you get it right! Beginnings are very important. For example, in the construction business, the foundations of any structure are the most important. Failing foundations lead to failing facilities. This is also true in music, athletics, and academics. If we get off on the wrong foot, then almost everything that follows is detrimentally affected for sure. 


Second, in chapter 6:10-17, the writer of Deuteronomy emphasizes that we must be realistic about life— make sure you keep it real! To dream is not wrong but to live in a “dream-world” is very wrong. When things are going well and we feel truly blessed, it is easy to drift away from where we first began and to forget who it was that got us to where we are. When we forget our beginnings, we can lose sight of who we should truly depend upon and whom we should thank for the good times we are experiencing. When that happens, we can easily drift into a world of false confidence and false dependence. As the writer of Deuteronomy tells the people of Israel, if you forget to correctly acknowledge who made you and established who you are, it is very likely you will lose what you possess, or at the very least, greatly diminish your present blessing. 


Third, in chapters 6:16-25, the writer warns us not to make foolish, self-inflicted mistakes—make sure you don’t have regrets! We only pass through life one time. Because of the nature of life, no one can go back and undo the foolish mistakes and regrets of the past. For that reason, the importance of carefully reading and obeying God’s manual on life, the Bible, cannot be overstated. God’s eternal promise to all obedient believers is that if we diligently study His Word and obey it, He promises to bless us and all our generations to follow. What the writer is emphasizing here is that life is not just about fun and laughter, though there is a place for that. Life is first about faith and loyalty, and it is extremely important that we get these priorities right.

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Luke 5: Answering Jesus' Call
Luke 5: Answering Jesus' Call

Calvary Baptist Temple • March 16, 2020

By Sarah Snyder


I resonate with Peter and the fisherman. One of my favorite hobbies is fishing. I love to be outdoors, throwing a lure, and just waiting to catch my biggest fish yet. Most often, however, I return home defeated and empty handed. I have got to be the worst fisher(wo)man ever. Seriously, I never catch anything. It does not matter how much I study or what lures I buy, I almost never catch anything. 


So I understand the feeling Peter and the others had that day at the Sea of Galilee when they returned home empty handed (Luke 5:5). The only difference between me and them is that I do not count on fishing for my livelihood. So here they are, cleaning their nets, tired and defeated, when Jesus walks up and asks for a ride. They must have heard about Jesus because Luke does not indicate that they questioned who he was and why he was asking for a ride in their boat. They take him out a little ways and he preaches. Luke also does not tell us what he said, but we can guess it was really good! When Jesus is done, He asks Peter to throw his nets out on the side. Now Peter does this for a living. I am sure that if he had decided to go back and fish, he would’ve thought and planned to go where he thought there might be fish. He wouldn’t waste his time fishing at some random spot. But he does as Jesus asks. And wouldn’t you believe it, he brings in so much fish he has to have two boats bring it all in (v. 7)! 


The most amazing aspect to me about this story is that Peter and the others left all these fish behind to follow Jesus. They finally have someone who could help them make more money then they had ever seen, yet they leave it all behind. That’s the power of Jesus in our lives. When He calls, we answer.


We see this again in Luke 5:27-32. This time Jesus calls a tax collector! The Jews considered tax collectors to be traitors and thieves! They were one of their own who had sold themselves to Rome, Israel's captor. When Jesus comes to Levi, he says two words, “Follow me” (v. 27). Such simple words, yet powerful from Jesus. Levi left all he had and followed Jesus. 


This passage often convicts me often as I read about Jesus eating with those His people considered sinners. When do I dine with those who our society has considered a castaway or sinner? When do I love those whom Jesus has loved, even when it’s difficult? 


Later in this book, Luke records Jesus saying this, “If anyone would come after me, let him deny himself and take up his cross daily and follow me” (9:23). In these two stores God shows us those who have given up on everything they had to follow Jesus. What’s interesting about this verse is that Jesus had not been crucified yet. To those who heard this message it would have sounded like taking on the rejection of the world, being publicly humiliated for Jesus’ sake. These are not people who had special powers to give up their lives. They were everyday people, just like us. They could answer the call, so can we. Pray this week that God would reveal to you how you can follow him. Pray that he will show you how to love your neighbor more like Jesus loves them.

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Numbers 20: On Display
Numbers 20: On Display

Calvary Baptist Temple • March 09, 2020

By Chris Watson


As a follower of Jesus, I daily struggle with being obedient to what God has asked me to do versus doing things my own way. Sometimes it’s because my way seems easier. Sometimes, my way and God’s way seem close enough, that it is hard to distinguish a difference. Unfortunately many times, I choose to do the thing that puts myself on display instead of God.


We see Moses and Aaron go through this in our reading this week in Numbers 20. Moses and Aaron have been leading God’s people around the desert for going on 40 years. Over those 40 years, they have seen their share of God’s provision, miracles, and His daily guidance in their lives. They have also seen their share of the people’s complaining, uprising, and disobedience to God. The people cry out against Moses and Aaron as they have done for the last 40 years. Complaining about leaving Egypt, about wandering the wilderness, about eating the manna that the Lord had miraculously provided each day, and about the lack of water. Hearing the grumbles of the people, Moses and Aaron go to God to cry out to Him on behalf of his people. God hears their requests and responds with these instructions: “Tell the rock before their eyes to yield its water.” So Moses and Aaron assemble the Israelites to meet at the rock as the Lord instructed. However, instead of speaking to the rock, Moses hits it twice with the staff. The rock still yields its water, and the entire community is still able to drink. 


This act at first seems like a simple mistake with no consequences. In fact, God had previously instructed Moses to hit a rock with his staff to yield water in Exodus 17:5. So maybe he was just confused. However, this is not what we are seeing here. First, we see the anger with which Moses addresses the Israelites in Numbers 20:10, “Hear now, you rebels,” he begins. Second, we see Moses taking credit for the act, “Must WE bring water out of this rock for you?” God’s power and strength are not referenced here. Moses does not tell the people that God has heard their cries and will give them their request. Instead, Moses goes marching in grumbling and complaining, and takes credit for the miracle that God is about to perform. God tells Moses and Aaron His frustration in verse 12: “Because you did not believe in me, to uphold me as holy in the eyes of the people of Israel.” To put it another way, because you did not trust me to display my holiness and chose to do it your own way. For this reason, Moses and Aaron are not permitted to enter the promised land.


During our time with the Life Action team last month, the team defined obedience as doing what I’m told to do, when I’m told to do it, with the right heart attitude. Due to the disobedience of Moses and Aaron, they missed out on inheriting the promised land. I have more than a handful of stories where my own way has taken precedent over God’s just like Moses and Aaron. I can’t do anything about those decisions now, but going forward I can ask myself, “Am I trusting God to display his Holiness?”


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Psalm 81: Let us Praise the Lord!
Psalm 81: Let us Praise the Lord!

Calvary Baptist Temple • March 02, 2020

By Jacob Mock


This week as our Bible reading brings us to Psalm 81, we are reminded of the importance of praising and thanking God. Verse 1 says to “Sing aloud to God,” and to “Shout for joy to the God of Jacob.” As I read this I am faced with a question: When is the last time I stopped for just a few minutes and thanked the Lord for everything He has done for me? I know sometimes I can get so caught up in the busyness of life that I almost completely forget to thank God for blessing me the way He has. So before you read any further, take a moment and thank God for His blessings on your life.

 

I love how the psalmist first says “Sing aloud” and “Raise a song” to God, but it doesn’t stop with that. The psalmist says “Praise Him with your tambourine, your lyre, your harp, or your trumpet!” Essentially he’s saying, “Hey, whatever you have in your hands, go ahead and praise God with it!” I think sometimes we can put praise and worship in a box, and then reserve that box for Sunday mornings only. Maybe you associate the word “worship” with “Sunday morning service.” The psalmist would most definitely disagree with that! You can praise God wherever you are, no matter what’s happening around you. Maybe that’s in your car on the way to work tomorrow morning. Maybe when you’re in the carpool line picking up your children from school. Maybe it’s right in the middle of a frustrating day at work. Wherever you find yourself during your days, you can worship Him there!

 

Church, let’s get serious about offering our praise and worship to God! Don’t let another day go by without thanking Him for His blessings. Don’t let yourself get so caught up in day to day life that you forget to be thankful. Verse 7 of this very Psalm reminds us of a reason to be thankful. “In distress, you called, and I delivered you; I answered you in the secret place of thunder…” God never leaves or forsakes you. When you are stressed out, lonely, and don’t see how you can carry on another minute, God is right there with you. Let’s take comfort in that truth, and let’s not forget to thank Him for it!

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Hebrews 5-7: Melchizedek
Hebrews 5-7: Melchizedek

Calvary Baptist Temple • February 24, 2020

One of the most fascinating people in the Bible to me is Melchizedek. He is mentioned in three books in the Bible. He is first seen in his meeting with Abraham in Genesis 14. Abraham, along with 318 fighting men from his own “house” had just come back from a successful military campaign against four kings who had taken his nephew Lot and many others as prisoners. As he brought back those miserable souls and all the spoil of war, he was “intercepted” by Melchizedek. The pagan and wicked king of Sodom had designed to meet with Abraham and offer him a very impressive compromise but before he could do so, Melchizedek met Abraham and “communed” with him. The scriptures say that he brought forth bread and wine. (Gen. 14:18) Abraham was blessed by him and gave him tithes of all he had. To be sure, there is much speculation around who he might be. He simply shows up and in a flash, he goes away forever. We never see him again in all the Bible and we don’t even know where he came from in the first place. I mean, we don’t know who his people are or who his parents are or how he came to be the priest of the most high God. Because of this, there are many who believe that He might actually be Christ making an Old Testament appearance. Some speculate that due to the fact that he is obviously a person who knows and serves the true God, he might be Shem, one of the sons of Noah who was possibly still alive. Needless to say that while we can’t be sure about any of that, we can be sure that his appearance in the Genesis is worth more to us than we might first believe.


The next time Melchizedek is mentioned is in Psalms 110:4. This psalm which is written by David is clearly a Psalm about Christ. In it, Christ is declared to be “a priest after the order of Melchizedek”. In this prophetic passage, the coming priesthood of Christ is likened to that of Melchizedek. The question that comes to my mind is, what exactly does it mean for Christ to be a priest “after the order of Melchizedek”? 


The answer to that question is found in the book of Hebrews where we read about Melchizedek once again. His name is mentioned nine times in the book and it is here that we begin to have more light shined upon him. Chapters 5,6, and 7 all mention Melchizedek, and it is in these chapters that we see the preeminence, perfection, and permanence of Christ’s priesthood in comparison to Melchizedek’s priesthood and in contrast to the priesthood of the Levites. The point is simply that Christ and his kingly priesthood (like Melchizedek’s) is superior in every respect to anything in the Levitical system. 


I encourage you to enjoy your readings this week and to pay close attention to what God is teaching us about our lovely Lord Jesus through the person of Melchizedek.

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Leviticus 4: It's all about Grace
Leviticus 4: It's all about Grace

Calvary Baptist Temple • February 18, 2020

By Sarah Snyder


Here’s a fun fact about me, I love the book of Leviticus! I know that sounds crazy, but seriously, I think it’s great! I think I find it so fascinating because it’s so foreign to me. I have no world to compare the life of sacrificing animals too. It makes no sense to me. So when I read this text, it’s learning about a whole new system of life. And yet, as foreign as it feels, it is still a message from the same God I worship. I think that’s the craziest part.


The book of Leviticus is not a book about the law, it’s a book about what to do when one breaks the law. God gave the law to Israel in Exodus. In Leviticus He is instructing the people on how to get back into communion with Him after they have broken a law. One thing that we miss when we read about the tabernacle and sacrifices is how messy it is. The tabernacle was a place of constant noise, people, animals, and, well, blood. There were always people bringing animals for sacrifice, noisy animals. There were priests constantly covered in blood as they slaughtered animal after animal. It is no wonder they had to clean themselves before entering the tabernacle. All of this takes place outside amongst the dirt and mud. There was blood flowing always and the smell was so powerful. Between the smell of sweaty people and animals, there was also the smell of smoke and burning animals. This place was the furthest thing from anything clean, neat, and orderly, and yet, God finds pleasure in it. It is in this space that He is honored. It is in the space that holiness prevails. 


One interesting thing to note is Leviticus 4:3-12. In this section, God is instructing Israel about the sins of the High Priest. He says, “If the High Priest sins so that the people are guilty, on account of the sin he has committed he must present a flawless young bull to the Lord for a sin offering.” The High Priest was the messenger between the people and God. When he sins, all of Israel has sinned. In order for them to be right with God, the priest had to be forgiven of his sins. It was a way in which Israel had to remain in communion with God. God had chosen for the High Priest to be interceeder for the people and when he was not right with God, they were not either. 


As overwhelming as this book is, there is an underlying message that cannot be missed: grace. This book is 100% about grace. God is so holy that He cannot have communion with us without some sort of absolution of sin. So He creates a way for Israel to be with Him. It seems crazy and overwhelming but it is a story of love and grace. God accepts the death of an animal on behalf of sinful people that they may be with Him. Even the High Priest, the one offering these sacrifices on behalf of the people, was given grace. The best part about this book for us is reading it knowing that the final chapter. Next week we will read Hebrews 4:14-16, which says, “ Therefore since we have a great high priest who has passed through the heavens, Jesus the Son of God, let us hold fast to our confession. For we do not have a high priest incapable of sympathizing with our weaknesses, but one who has been tempted in every way just as we are, yet without sin. Therefore let us confidently approach the throne of grace to receive mercy and find grace whenever we need help.” Jesus came as our great High Priest to absolve our sin absolutely and finally. As thankful as we can be that God created a way for Israel to be in communion with Him, I am even more thankful that Jesus came as the ultimate sacrifice, once and for all.

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Philippians 2: Where is Your Focus?
Philippians 2: Where is Your Focus?

Calvary Baptist Temple • February 10, 2020

By Patrick Mulvehill

“Do nothing from selfish ambition or conceit, but in humility count others more significant than yourselves.” - Philippians 2:3 ESV

From the moment I was born into this world, my human nature dictated that there was only one person that mattered, only one set of needs that had to be met….mine. From the first cry to the first bottle, to the first diaper change, it was all about me. As I grew up and a little brother came along it became a daily battle to make sure that my needs were coming first. As a young teenager, the fight continued as I struggled to establish myself in the dog eat dog world that was middle and high school. I believed that I had to look out for #1 because no one else was going to do it.

Imagine my shock when as a teenager I was reborn into the Life of Christ to find out that I am supposed to put the needs of others before my own!?!! All of a sudden I had 15 years of self-focus that now had to be retrained to focus on others before myself. Not an easy task! In fact, it has been a thirty-two year struggle of remembering that the needs of others should be my primary concern. My daily challenge is also my challenge to you, are you humbling yourself and putting the needs of others above your own? How have you put someone else above yourself today?

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Exodus 14: The Great Escape!
Exodus 14: The Great Escape!

Calvary Baptist Temple • February 03, 2020

By Allan Bosson

In our “reading through the Bible in a year,” we are now coming to the book of Exodus. Wow, what a truly exciting book this is with such an intense and gripping drama! Here we have somewhere between two and three million people of all ages, about to embark on a journey after 400 years of captivity in Egypt, to a land none of them had ever seen before. Here they are walking out of Egypt with nothing but their lives and the clothes on their backs. And, they were asked to leave everything behind and start this arduous journey by foot to “the Promised Land.” 

Do you think they were a little apprehensive about this whole thing? Maybe somewhat afraid? I’m sure there were a mountain of challenging thoughts and uncertain feelings rushing through their minds and their lives. What if Moses had misread God’s will? They had burned their bridges behind them in Egypt. There was no going back. All they knew to do now was follow Moses, as he led them on the “great escape.” This escape would prove to be the greatest escape from enemy captivity ever in the history of mankind.

Eventually, almost exhausted, the Israelites came to the Red Sea. What now? Two million or more people could never swim the Red Sea together. ‘Okay, Moses, you strong and brave leader, what are your plans now?’ Again, a very good question, especially since the Israelites had no wood to build boats and no time to build them even if they could. And look at that big dust cloud behind them. It was Pharaoh’s army, and Pharaoh wasn’t planning on congratulating them on their brave escape. Remember, all the firstborn in Egypt were dead, and Pharaoh strongly felt someone needed to pay for that crime. 

Have you ever been in a situation when you have come up against an immovable barrier and right behind you was another mighty force ready to pounce and finally destroy you, or at least it seemed that way? I am sure you have because you’re human, and in life, we all face barriers and forces far greater than ourselves. In those times, it seems, without a miracle, those forces will consume us and steal so much from our life that maybe life will never be the same again.

Well, what is the answer? The truth was, Moses was not alarmed at the situation in the same way all the people were. Moses simply admitted his utter inability to solve the situation himself and cried out to God for help. (Hmmm, what a very novel idea!) What was God’s answer to Moses? ‘Well, thanks Moses, I was waiting for you to do that. Now let me tell you what to do. Get up, go forward and lead the people.’ In Ex. 14:13, when Moses got his answer, he encouraged the people and himself, “Fear not, now stand firm and see the salvation of the Lord . . . the Egyptians whom you see today, you will never see again. The Lord will fight for us and you only have to obey and be silent.” Then God said again to Moses, “Lift up that little stick you are carrying, and hold it over the Sea.” Immediately when Moses did that, a strong east wind began to blow, and it blew all night. In the morning, they saw before them two huge walls of water, one on the left, the other on the right. There is was, a dry roadway open before them reaching right across the long stretch of the sea. The entire nation of Israel, at Moses’ beckoning, rushed onto the roadway and raced across the vast crossing as fast as they could ahead of the oncoming Egyptian army. Just as the last person exited the opening in the sea, the Israelites looked back only to see the Egyptian army enter the roadway speeding after them. And the people said, “Moses, look what you have done to us. Would it not have been better to serve the Egyptians than to die here in this wilderness?” Then suddenly, when all of the Egyptian army was in the sea, there came a terrible roaring sound and all of those vast, high walls of water came tumbling down and swallowed up the entire Egyptian army.

So, what is the main lesson here. In all honesty, there are many lessons here, but I will mention just a few. First, don’t ever count God out, no matter how impossible the challenge is before you. When God makes promises to set you free from your challenges in life, He’ll keep His promise. Like Moses, you simply have to put aside doubt, exercise faith and trust Him. Second, don’t ever question the power of true, committed, sincere prayer. This kind of prayer can hold back mountains of water, take away the stress of fear and open up a way before you that you never would have imagined possible. But, third, and perhaps most important, very often the challenges before us are there to prepare and strengthen us to deal with even bigger challenges that are coming up behind.  Our God always has an amazing plan to take us through every trial! 

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Galatians 3:1-5: Let the Spirit Work!
Galatians 3:1-5: Let the Spirit Work!

Calvary Baptist Temple • January 27, 2020

By Sarah Snyder


Do you ever find yourself snippy with someone? Do you ever get fed up with someone and respond sarcastically? If you’ve ever spent more than 5 minutes with me, you know that I am a very sarcastic person, probably to a fault. Most of my sarcastic responses are humorous in nature as opposed to being annoyed with someone. So it should be no surprise that as I was reading for this week I found myself pausing at a moment of, what I call, Sarcastic Paul. Of all the New Testament writers, Paul is by far the most sarcastic. If you’ve spent any time in Romans you know this to be true. 


Our reading this week brings us to one of these sarcastic moments. We begin reading this week in Galatians, a letter Paul wrote to the church of Galatia to address some issues between the Jew and Gentile Christians. In Chapter 2, Paul writes that some church leaders had led the Jewish Christians astray by falsely saying that Gentile Christians ought to be circumcised as a requirement for their salvation. In Galatians 2:15-21, Paul states that though they may have been Jews by birth, since Jesus has been crucified, they are no longer justified by the law. If we say we are justified by Christ, yet still seek justification through the law, then Christ died in vain. 


This leads us to Galatians 3:1-5, where we get a taste of Sarcastic Paul. He starts by calling them foolish since they saw Christ being crucified vividly portrayed (v.1). He then asks them these questions, “The only thing I want to learn from you is this: Did you receive the Spirit by doing the works of the law or by believing what you heard? Are you so foolish? Although you began with the Spirit, are you now trying to finish by human effort” (vv.2-3)? It should be obvious to us that these are rhetorical questions. Paul is instructing the Jewish Christians that their attempt to bring the law back into the salvation story only inhibits the work of the Spirit. It was clear that we could never perfectly keep the law. That is why Christ came. The law was a bandaid for our sin problem and Christ was the solution.


So why did Paul react so sarcastically? Is sarcasm justifiable? It is hard for me to imagine that Paul would react so strongly to this correction if they did not know any better. But reading the context from chapter 1 onward, it is clear that Paul had already addressed this issue, not only with them, but other church leaders. But what’s the big deal? The big deal is that this is a gospel issue, a deep one. Christ came once and for all. There are no works needed to partake in salvation. The moment we add any works to being saved we void what Christ has done. We could never obtain salvation on our own, that’s why the law was a bandaid. Christ was the final authority and salvation was a gift to humanity. And now “[we] have been crucified with Christ, and it is no longer [us] who live, but Christ lives in [us]. So the life [we] now live in the body, [we] live because of the faithfulness of the Son of God, who loved [us] and gave himself for [us]” (2:20). So I want to thank Paul for being sarcastic. He left no room to question where our salvation comes from and for that I am thankful. 

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Life: On Mission
Life: On Mission

Calvary Baptist Temple • January 20, 2020

By Chris Watson


This week we have the opportunity to read about what many refer to as passion week in the book of Mark. In chapters 11-16 we visit a story that is all too familiar to many of us. So much so that some of us glaze over the topic each Easter, knowing that the story will come around or be referenced continually throughout the year. As I read over the details of Jesus’ life, ministry, death, and resurrection one of the biggest things to jump off the page is the mission with which Jesus lives His life. 


We don’t get a ton of details of the childhood of Christ, but Jesus pops onto the scene immediately following His baptism. We get our first glimpse of Jesus’ awareness of the mission He is on at the Wedding in Cana found in John 2. Mary asks Jesus to perform His first miracle at the wedding, and Jesus, knowing God’s plan and timing for His life responds, “My time has not yet come.”


Now let’s pick up in this past week’s reading. We see in Mark 8-10 Jesus tries to prepare His disciples 3 different times for what they are going to see, and experience in the coming weeks once they enter Jerusalem. The first in 8:31 Jesus tells them plainly that He will be rejected and killed, and three days later would rise again. Peter doesn’t care too much for Jesus speaking this way and takes Jesus aside to tell Him not to talk that way. Jesus then calls Peter out to say that Peter’s mind is not on the things of God, but the things of man. This is our first glimpse into the not my will, but yours be done mentality that Jesus lives His life with. Jesus tries to get His disciples to wrap their heads around these things 2 more times before they reach Jerusalem, but they just don’t get it. 


Finally, we reach Jerusalem. The scene of the crime. The place that Jesus just told His disciples He will be betrayed, mocked, beat and crucified. Still, He marches on toward the mission. As Jesus and His disciples approached Jerusalem, we get another glimpse into the specific detail to which He knows His fate. Before they even enter He tells His disciples how they are going to enter, where they will find the colt, and how the people will react to their taking of it. Again in chapter 14, as a woman is chastised for dumping an expensive bottle of perfume on His feet, He corrects them and tells them that she is preparing His body for burial. We see Him reference His broken body and poured out blood during the Lord’s supper. Finally, in a moment of true anguish, we see Jesus’ final plea to God, if there is any way to change course from the mission, but completes the request with “Not my will, but yours be done.”


“So what” you may say. “Jesus is God after all. He knew that it would all turn out in perfection in the end. This is the reason He came in the first place.” However, as He experiences all of the betrayal, the mocking, the beatings, and the crucifixion, He is still flesh. His body is still going to experience the most gruesome, brutal execution saved for the worst of criminals. All of this to accomplish the mission set before Him by His father, the redemption of mankind. 


And as Jesus’ mission on earth has been completed through His death, burial, and resurrection, so too he charges his followers with a new mission in Matthew 28:19-20. That mission is to “go and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, and teaching them to be obey everything I have commanded you.” So as we have been assigned our mission from Jesus the question is: Will you live your life on mission?

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